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Erik

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Reply with quote  #1 
I've had several ideas for larger sculptures I'd like to keep outside and I was wondering if anyone had any experiences with weathering fired work? I remember Von Allen said she had something she used for weatherproofing at the workshop she gave, did anyone get the name of the waterproofing material she used?

I do like the patina of age, though, and I'm not sure I want to make these things completely weatherproof and would be curious to know if anybody has had any experience with the effects of the seasons on work outdoors beyond watching terracotta planters crumble through the winter. I'm probably going to try to get some test pieces out that are unglazed and fired to different cones to see how they do through the next year, but I would appreciate any pointers anyone has.

Dawn

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Reply with quote  #2 
Von Allen did send the information about the sealer.  Here is what she wrote:

The sealer, if you can believe it is called " Impregnator" and ask at tile or cement stores. It very expensive.. like almost $50 per gallon. so you might want to go in with a couple of people and buy it. Days before you seal, run water over your piece and check for water traps. Then seal any water trap crevices with oil clay, or putty,. then let it dry several days and give it a coat of Impregnator. Its a wonderful product, not generally known to ceramic artists.


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wljames

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Reply with quote  #3 
I would like to know about your tests with clays fired to different cones.

Home and Yard Pottery at 8610 S State sells pottery made with "Vietnam Black Clay." It seems to hold up to winter without any problem. These are unglazed pots, supposedly "high fired."
Dawn

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Reply with quote  #4 
I have a great example of what a Utah winter will do to saggar fired clay.  This is cone 10 clay (coleman porcelain) bisqued to cone 06 and then saggar fired to 1700 degrees (lower than the bisque).  Although the clay was protected with a clear spray paint, the water/ice obviously got in.  Trying impregnator this year.

I have had my cone 10 glazeware in my garden for over 10 years with no breakage or even weathering.  Obviously full vitrification of the clay makes a big difference.

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Dawn Atkin

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