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New2Clay

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Reply with quote  #1 

Any suggestions for a deep black glaze?  Looking for Cone 9-10, but mainly interested in what makes a glaze nice and deep black.

Dawn

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Reply with quote  #2 

Here is a nice translucent black with a hint of tan

 

Peack Black Temmoku

Cone 10 redux

 

Whiting 17.32%

G-200 Feldspar 49.51%

EPK 9.9%

Flint 23.27%

add: 

  Tin Ox 1%

  Red Iron Ox 9.6%

  Macaloid 1%

 

-Dawn

 


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Dawn Atkin
Dawn

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Reply with quote  #3 

Check the green glaze topic for a beautiful black created by the Blindingly Bright Green under Jewel Glaze saphire blue variation.

 

-Dawn


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Tara

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Reply with quote  #4 
This is a little off the subject, but I was wondering if anyone had more information about Val Cushing's black glaze recipe.

A studio glaze at BYU-Idaho was labeled "Cushing Black" and made a nice shiny black.  The recipe on the studio glaze list was surprisingly simple.  The measurements are in grams for a large trash-can batch.

4000  Alberta Slip
750    Nepheline Syenite
250    Cobalt Carbonate

However, when I got online to learn more about it, I found a couple of other recipes also "Cushing Blacks"--but most were really complex.  The most common variation was something like this:

Albany slip 65
nepheline syenite 10
barium carb. 10
talc 15
chrome ox. 1
manganese diox. 1
cobalt carb. 2
iron ox. 2

Does anyone happen to have the "real" Cushing black glaze, or know where I can find it?  Also, wouldn't the chrome in this second recipe make the glaze not food safe?
Thanks,
Tara


boropotter

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Reply with quote  #5 
A have a few black glaze recipes that I have used in the past (including the Cushing Black glaze mentioned.)

My favorite black is Metallic Black.  It was a studio glaze at ClaySpace, a community clay studio in Erie, PA.  It looks the best on porcelain or white stoneware bodies. 

Metallic Black cone 10 reduction/oxidation
Custer Feldspar     79
Gerstley Borate     11
Whiting     5
EPK      5
Add:
Cobalt Carb.   4
Copper Carb.   4
Manganese Diox.   4

Satin Doll Black was a studio glaze when I was a student at SUU.  It isn't a good liner glaze (it tends to bubble and bloat).  It is a deep, smooth black in reduction that can go a little brown with some gold/green spots if fired in oxidation.  It works well with other glazes layered under or over it.

Satin Doll Black cone 10 reduction
Red Art     46.74
Nepheline Syenite    13.63
Talc     18.84
Strontium Carb.     7.76
Whiting     6.63
EPK     3.63
Flint     2.76
Add:
Red Iron Ox.  1
Cobalt Carb.   2
Chrome Ox.   2
Manganese Diox.  1

I was a student at Ricks College (a.k.a. BYU-Idaho) and used Cushing Black on nearly everything.  I tried to find the recipe later and had a hard time tracking it down.  While in grad school in PA, one of the grads had gone to Alfred and had a recipe for Cushing's Black.

Cushing's Black cone 9-10
Custer Feldspar     20
Soda Feldspar      20
Flint/Silica           20
Dolomite             15
Talc                     13
OM-4 Ball Clay   10
Whiting                2
Add:
Cobalt Carb.         3
Red Iron Ox.        3
Manganese Diox.  2
Chrome Ox.          1

-Jared.
pottenbakker

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Reply with quote  #6 
Quote:
Originally Posted by New2Clay

Any suggestions for a deep black glaze?  Looking for Cone 9-10, but mainly interested in what makes a glaze nice and deep black.

pottenbakker

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Posts: 2
Reply with quote  #7 

looking for a satin matt black glaze that can be used as a liner on functional pots.  can anyone help?

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